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8 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Ayutthaya and where to stay


Wat Chaiwatthanaram

Are you thinking of going on a day trip to Ayutthaya? Don’t think twice, do it. The historic city of Ayutthaya Thailand, once the reigning Ayutthaya Kingdom, houses magnificent temple ruins, a fascinating mix of cultures, and delicious food. You have two options: one is to plan an Ayutthaya day trip from Bangkok, and the second is to organize a 2 or 3 days trip to Ayutthaya. It doesn’t matter which option you choose, here is a list of 8 unmissable things to do in Ayutthaya that you must add to your itinerary. A lot of tourists go by train to Chiang Mai, I suggest jumping off the train for a couple of days in Ayutthaya

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon

Explore Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Great Monastery of Auspicious Victory)

This Buddhist temple in Ayutthaya is famous for its enormous, beautiful main chedi and reclining Buddha statue image. It was one of the most important temples of its time, and the complex is truly impressive. You can dive even deeper into its rich history and join the locals in their prayers, making your day trip to Ayutthaya a memorable one.

– Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon opening hours: 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

– Entrance fee: 20 Baht

Wat Chaiwatthanaram

See one of the finest prangs at Wat Chaiwatthanaram

Considered one of the most photogenic temples of Ayutthaya, Wat Chaiwatthanaram is a lovely sight rising from the west bank of the Chao Phraya River. One of the best ways to see it is from a boat tour that goes around the three rivers surrounding the main Ayutthaya island. On the site itself, you’ll find a towering Khmer-style central prang and eight smaller chedis surrounding it. The chedis also have remnants of paintings depicting the Buddha’s life. It is an unmissable temple in Ayutthaya.

– Wat Chaiwatthanaram opening hours: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM

– Entrance fee: 50 Baht

Wat Ratchaburana

Wat Ratchaburana

Located on Ayutthaya island and part of the Ayutthaya Historical Park, the temple has one of the most beautiful main prang or central towers in the park. There are also elegant carvings and sculptures of mythical animals on the site. A crypt on the east side also held many relics, which are now on display at the Chao Phraya National Museum. The temple also has a heartbreaking story behind it, which I won’t spoil, but it’s worth walking through its history.

– Wat Ratchaburana opening hours: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM

– Entrance fee: 50 Baht

Wat Phanan Choeng

Wat Phanan Choeng

If you can only see one grand Buddha image during your Ayutthaya day trip, make sure to visit the image at Wat Phanan Choeng. The gilded Buddha statue image stands at an incredible 19 meters inside a temple built in 1324, before the founding of the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It has a long and fascinating history that you can learn all about during a tour there.

– Wat Phanan Choeng opening hours: 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

– Entrance fee: 20 Baht


Wat Mahathat

Wat Mahathat

What are the chances that the head of a Buddha statue would be found wrapped in a Bodhi tree? This is the fantastic sight you will see at Wat Mahathat, one of the must-visit temples in Ayutthaya. The temple itself is also impressive, with many elegant Khmer-style towers. Back in the Ayutthaya Kingdom, the temple was also an important center of Buddhism, housing many precious relics found during later excavations.

– Wat Mahathat opening hours: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM

– Entrance fee: 50 Baht


Wat Mahathat

Wat Phra Si Sanphet

So beautiful is the architecture of this temple that the Temple of the Emerald Buddha (Wat Phra Kaew), built later in Bangkok, was modeled after it. The most striking features here are the three grand stupas that hold the ashes of three Ayutthaya kings. Constructed in 1448, it was a royal monastery of the Ayutthaya Kingdom, which held many important ceremonies of that time.

– Wat Phra Si Sanphet opening hours: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM

– Entrance fee: 50 Baht

Wat Phra Si Sanphet

Wat Lokayasutharam

Nearby Wat Phra Si Sanphet, Wat Lokayasutharam is an impressive and essential place for locals to pay their respects to the Buddha. There, you’ll find an enormous reclining Buddha image statue depicting the Buddha at the time of his death and entering Nirvana, the revered state of nothingness after death central to Buddhism.

– Opening hours: 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

– Entrance fee: Free to enter

Wat Lokayasutharam

Wat Phu Khao Thong

At 50 meters tall, Wat Phu Khao Thong is the largest temple structure in Ayutthaya, with a soaring stupa painted white. It has staircases up to a large panoramic platform from where you get a wonderful view across the countryside and can even see some of the city’s other prangs in the distance. The temple was founded in 1387 but the main stupa next to it was built in 1569 by the Burmese king as a way to celebrate a victory over Ayutthaya. Two decades later, when Ayutthaya was liberated, the stupa was enlarged to mark that victory.

– Wat Phu Khao Thong opening hours: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM

– Entrance fee: Free to enter

Wat Phu Khao Thong

Where to stay:


Baan Baimai Boutique Room

Conveniently situated in the Tha Wa Su Kri part of Ayutthaya, this property puts you close to attractions and interesting dining options. Most Temples are within 1 km from the room, they also have bicycles for rent at 50 Bath a day but when it's not so warm you can walk also its about 10 min walk. Rooms are around 20 Eur a night with no breakfast, but around the corner, there is a good restaurant( Nature coffee in the garden ) with breakfast around 3 Eur or you can try local food for about 1 Eur in the many local restaurants.

Baan Baimai Boutique Room


Baan Baimai Boutique Room

Krodyle Mindfulness House

Conveniently situated in the Tha Wa Su Kri part of Ayutthaya, this property puts you close to attractions and interesting dining options.

Krodyle Mindfulness House

Cattani's Riverside Home

Conveniently situated in the Suan Plik part of Ayutthaya, this property puts you close to attractions and interesting dining options. this high-quality property provides guests with access to massage and a restaurant on-site.

Cattani's Riverside Home

The Park Ayutthaya Resort and Spa

Probably this property is the closest you can find near the temples, Conveniently situated in the Tha Wa Su Kri part of Ayutthaya, this property puts you close to attractions and interesting dining options. Don't leave before paying a visit to the famous Historic City of Ayutthaya

The Park Ayutthaya Resort and Spa


History

Ayutthaya was officially founded in 1351, although there were people already living in the area before then. As Sukhothai’s influence waned, Ayutthaya saw an opportunity to assert itself as a new power in the region and began to expand its territories and take over other urban centers adjacent to it. The Ayutthaya Kingdom, the second of Thailand’s capitals, was born. The Kingdom of Ayutthaya didn’t control vast swathes of land, but it was able to grow as one of the wealthiest cities in Southeast Asia. One of the main reasons for this was that the city was located on an island where three rivers met. Aside from the strategic defense advantage of this location, its position put Ayutthaya at a critical juncture of international trade, because these rivers led to seas where ships could sail in from. Ayutthaya grew in size and an ambitious campaign of construction saw great temples and monasteries built around the Royal Palace in the city center. At the same time, traders came from across the world and began to form settlements along the riverbanks around the main island.

Wat Chaiwatthanaram

The Portuguese were the first to arrive, followed by other European powers like the Dutch and French, as well as traders from China, India, and the Middle East. Some experts believe that during this period, Ayutthaya would’ve had a population of more than a million people



By the beginning of the 18th century, the Thai rulers had become concerned about the impact of foreign religions, and the borders were closed to Westerners. However, trade with other regional powers – particularly China – meant Ayutthaya maintained its economic and political status.

It wasn’t until the Burmese, after generations of conflict, finally toppled Ayutthaya in 1767 that the kingdom came to an end. Rather than rebuild, the Thais moved their capital down the Chao Phraya River to Thonburi… and then Bangkok.

Wat Mahathat

#Thailand #Ayyuthaya